The ADAPT team

The ADAPT team was formed in 2008, when Reinout Wiers received a prestigious VICI grant from the Dutch government for his project, 'Implicit Cognition and Addiction: Changing Perspectives and New Interventions'. Since then, several key members have joined. Below you can find more information on the members of our team.



Reinout Wiers (PhD), Professor of developmental psychopathology

Biographical sketch
Prof. Wiers is full professor of developmental psychopathology at the University of Amsterdam. He is internationally known for his work on implicit cognitive processes in addiction. He published over 200 international papers and chapters, mostly on this subject and received the prestigious VIDI (2002) and VICI (2008) research grants from the Dutch National Science Foundation (N.W.O.) for research on implicit cognition and addiction. With Alan Stacy, he edited the Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction (SAGE, 2006). He is senior editor of the no 1 ranked journal in the field (Addiction) and on the editorial board of several other Addiction journals.

Main Research Topics
My main research topic concerns the (neuro-)cognitive processes involved in the etiology of addictive behaviors, and related psychopathology. In our lab we investigate what changes in people's mind/brain as they develop addictive behaviors. We also try to directly influence the processes involved in addiction, in order to study the causal status of these processes and ultimately to "re-train" these processes back to normal, which would imply increased control over addictive behaviors.

See my UvA profile and full list of publications.

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Helle Larsen (PhD), Assistant Professor

My research interests concern the underlying processes of substance use in adolescence and young adulthood on one hand and on the other hand how we can use this knowledge to develop and implement interventions. During my PhD, I investigated social and cognitive processes related to imitation of alcohol consumption among young adults. To study these processes, I conducted a series of experimental observational studies combined with several tasks assessing implicit cognitive processes (e.g., Implicit associations, approach-avoidance bias). Currently, I am testing a smoking cessation RCT intervention developed in collaboration with Prof. Reinout Wiers (UvA) and Dr. Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin (Yale University, US). The goal of this project is to investigate automatic approach tendencies toward smoking-related stimuli among young adolescent smokers and non-smokers. Moreover, to test the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral therapy combined with cognitive bias modification (i.e., tobacco approach-avoidance training) related to smoking cessation in adolescents.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Janna Cousijn (PhD), Assistant Professor

I am a scientist with an interdisciplinary background in neurobiology, medicine and psychology. Central to my studies is the search for neurocognitive predictors of adolescent onset psychopathologies like addiction. I thereby study the interaction between affective processes (reward, emotions) and cognitive control in the brain. I received my Doctorate Cum Laude for identifying predictors of cannabis dependence with a novel combination of neuroimaging techniques (structural MRI, functional MRI, connectivity analyses) and neuropsychological tasks applied to a large group of difficult to find cannabis users and closely matched controls. I currently am one of the leading neuroscientists investigating cannabis dependence, collaborating with various national and international Universities. After finishing by PhD, I was invited at the Brain and Development Lab Leiden University to work as a postdoc where I extended my knowledge on the study of typical and atypical brain development. In 2014 I moved to Utrecht University where I was responsible for theory development and neurocognitive task selection in a large-scale (6000 children) 10-year longitudinal neuroimaging study on brain development (NWO Zwaartekracht). Recently, I started as an assistant professor in Developmental Neuroscience at the University of Amsterdam. In future projects I would like to study common and unique neurobiological mechanisms underlying highly comorbid disorders like addiction, depression and anxiety over the course of development.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Elske Salemink (PhD), Assistant professor

Biographical sketch
Elske Salemink obtained her PhD in 2008 at the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology at Utrecht University. During this period, she also worked at the University of Western Australia , Perth in collaboration with Professor Colin Macleod. In 2011, she obtained her registration as a behavioural and cognitive therapist at the Dutch Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy (VGCt). She currently works as an Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam, Department of Developmental Psychology and as a Researcher and Cognitive Behavioural Therapist at the Bascule, Academic Centre Youth Mental Health care. She obtained a VENI grant (NWO) and ZonMW grant to study processing biases in anxiety and alcohol use.

Main Research Topics
My research interests concern cognitive processes in the aetiology and treatment of anxiety, depression, and addictive disorders. In the context of experimental psychopathology, I aim to better understand the factors that play a role in the development of problematic anxiety and depressive symptoms, and excessive alcohol use. Furthermore, and also in line with my clinical background, I focus on (innovative) methods to reduce these anxiety, depression, and addiction-related symptoms, both in adolescents and in adults.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Marija Maric (PhD), Assistant professor

Dr. Maric, Marija is an assistant professor clinical developmental psychology and cognitive behavioral therapist. Her main research areas include investigation of effectiveness and mechanisms of interventions for youth anxiety, child abuse, negative self-esteem, trauma, and comorbid anxiety and ADHD. In her research, she uses both RCT designs as well as single-case experimental design methodology. She teaches bachelor and master courses in the area of youth interventions, and trains therapists in the use of single-case methodology to assess individual client progress. Dr. Maric is the winner of the Wim Truijsburgprijs for the best Dutch junior researcher conducting clinical practice relevant research.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Nicole Oei (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

Originally a stress-memory researcher, I expanded my horizon at the ADAPT lab, by studying the stress-addiction association. Currently, I investigate the genetic modulation of stress-induced cortisol and its related activity in the brain's reward system, to predict future escalations in addictive behaviors, such as excessive alcohol-, drug- or porn use.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Anke Klein (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

Biographical sketch
Anke Klein is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Psychology Department (Developmental Psychopathology) of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and she is also affiliated with the Student Medical Service of the UvA. After combining three Master degrees in Pedagogical Science, Developmental Psychology and a Research Master in Psychological Science, she obtained her PhD in Social Science (Cum Laude) at the Radboud University, Nijmegen. She is a qualified university teacher (BKO) and has worked as ‘orthopedagoge’ and clinical child psychologist in several clinics (NVO and BAPD certificates). Anke her main research interest is the transmission of parental psychopathology to their children, and the treatment of internalizing disorders from childhood to young adulthood. The strength of her research lies in the combination of theoretically driven but clinically relevant studies and the use of different approaches to study normal and abnormal behavior in children and young adults. Anke received a two-year Niels Stensen Fellowship awards (2016) for outstanding talented young scientists to work in Germany, and she recently received an individual postdoctoral fellowship of ZonMW (2018-2023). Furthermore, Anke is currently involved in the 'Students Health Care Project'. This project is an initiative of Faculty Professor Wiers and Medical Doctor Peter Vonk with the goal to improve the mental heath of university students at the University of Amsterdam. Anke is the daily project manager and senior postdoc on the project.

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Bram Van Bockstale (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

Most of my past research concerned the relation between attentional bias for threat and fear and anxiety. More specifically, through the use of attentional bias modification (ABM) training, I investigated whether attentional bias for threat is a cause of fear and anxiety. Although there are some encouraging findings in this field, my research has revealed that there are certain limitations to ABM in the context of fear and anxiety. My present research mainly focuses on adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation and the training of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, both in adolescents and young adults.

Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.nl/citations?user=2w2nKh0AAAAJ&hl=nl
Researchgate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bram_Van_Bockstaele

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Anne Marije Kaag (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

I studied psychobiology (bachelor) and brain and cognitive sciences (master) at the University of Amsterdam. From 2012 to 2016 I carried out my PhD research at the department of psychiatry and radiology at the Academic Medical Center. My PhD research focused on the neural mechanisms underlying conditioned and emotional responses in regular cocaine users. In addition I studied the relation between (poly)substance use and structural brain alterations. In April 2016 I started as a post-doctoral researcher in the ADAPT-lab, in collaboration with the department of psychiatry at the AMC and the group of Taco de Vries at the VU University. In this translational project we are going to investigate if working memory training can be used as to disrupt the reconsolidation of alcohol-related memories. Publications: http://www.annemarijekaag.com/publications/

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Jorien Treur (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

My main research interests are the genetics of substance use (smoking, alcohol, cannabis) and the link between substance use and mental health. In 2016 I obtained my PhD at VU University in Amsterdam. During my PhD project I collected and analyzed data of thousands of twins and their family members to disentangle genetic from environmental influences on substance use. After obtaining my PhD, I received a NWO Rubicon grant to work as a post-doc at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. In Bristol I have specialized in a novel method that is increasingly being applied for causal inference: 'Mendelian randomization'. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants predictive of an ‘exposure’ variable as an instrument, or proxy, to test causal effects on an ‘outcome’ variable. Because genes are randomly transmitted from parents to offspring, and an outcome cannot alter a person’s genes, this method suffers much less from confounding and reverse causality than conventional observational research. Recently, I obtained a NWO VENI grant which will allow me to investigate the link between smoking and cognitive functioning with genetic methods (in collaboration with the department of psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC) as well as experimental methods (in collaboration with ADAPT). For the experimental part of this project I will conduct a cognitive training study to determine whether improving cognitive functioning (inhibitory control, working memory) through training helps smokers to quit.

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Gabry Mies (PhD), Post-doctoral researcher

Gabry has a background in biology (Wageningen University, 2005). She currently works as a post-doctoral researcher at the department of Psychiatry of Amsterdam UMC – AMC, and as a teacher at the department of Developmental Psychology. Together with Dr. Janna Cousijn she investigates adolescent resilience to alcohol use disorders. In this project, funded by Amsterdam Brain and Cognition (ABC), and in collaboration with the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), adults and adolescents are compared on their neural responses to alcohol cues. Her previous post-doctoral work at Radboud University and KU Leuven focused on impulsivity, reward sensitivity and mental effort in adolescents with ADHD, using behavioral and psychophysiological measures (fMRI, pupillometry). She obtained her PhD in 2011 at the department of Psychiatry of the Erasmus MC in Rotterdam, where she studied performance monitoring in depression, focusing on behavioral and psychophysiological indices of feedback processing (fMRI, ERPs, heart rate).

See my UvA profile and list of publications.

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Eva Schmitz (MSc), PhD student

After finishing a bachelor in psychology at Leiden University, I followed the research master and did a clinical internship developmental psychology at Leiden University. After graduating in 2012, I gained some clinical experience in a private practice for children and adolescents. In March 2015, I started my PhD-project about math anxiety at the University of Amsterdam. I work under supervision of Reinout Wiers, Elske Salemink and Brenda Jansen.

My project focusses on implicit processes in math anxiety in adolescents. Math anxiety is a crucial factor in math achievement and future careers. The project aims to investigate the concept and underlying mechanisms of the causal and maintaining factors of math anxiety. We will investigate whether cognitive biases play a role and the malleability of cognitive biases. We will use computerized training programmes with the ultimate aim to alleviate math anxiety and underperformance.

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Yang Liu (MSc), PhD student

I am a Ph.D. candidate supervised by Prof. Richard Ridderinkhof, Prof .Reinout Wiers and Wery van den Wildenberg (all of developmental psychology, UvA). The aim of my research is to investigate the alcohol users/ alcohol addicts' inhibition ability. Apart from the cued/signaled inhibition, which could be measured by the go-nogo or stop signal task, we would like to explore this population's intentional inhibition ability. Technics such as EEG and fMRI might be used to help finding the underlying mechanism.

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.nl/citations?hl=en&user=MfXCPjMAAAAJ&view_op=list_works

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Si Wen (MSc), PhD student

I did my master program in Psychology in Southwest University, Chongqing, China, from 2011 to 2014. During this time, my research interests mainly focused on exploring the risk and preventive factors related to general mental health of nurses by using Stress and Coping model (one study), and to postpartum depression of new mothers by using Learned helplessness model (another study), as well as the mechanism underlying these relationships. In terms of the methodology, mediation, moderation, and moderation mediation models were used in these studies. At the same time, I was also interested in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). I completed the full course and attended professional training of CBT, and got the certificate in China. After I graduated (excellent graduate) in 2014, I immediately moved to the Netherlands and started my 4- year PhD project in University of Amsterdam. Currently, I was supervised by Prof. Reinout Wiers, and Dr. Helle Larsen. My PhD topic mainly focuses on investigating the effectiveness of cognitive bias modification alone (e.g., action tendency re-training in the pilot study), and combined with inhibition control training (e.g., response inhibition training in the big study) together on smoking cessation behaviours over the web among Chinese adult smokers. Though these studies, I would like to answer not only which intervention(s) has effects on quitting smoking, but also how (mediators) the intervention (s) is benefit to the smokers and when (moderators) the intervention (s) may have more benefits for the smokers. Finally, since these evidence-based interventions are new in China, I would like to investigate what kind of Chinese smokers are interested in participating these online smoking cessation aids by describing their characteristics.
See my UvA profile.

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Mae Nuijs (MSc), PhD student

After finishing the Research Master's Psychology at the University of Amsterdam in 2014, I applied for a NWO Research Talent grant together with dr. Elske Salemink, dr. Helle Larsen, and Prof. Reinout Wiers. This NWO proposal passed the first but not final round and is now funded by the University of Amsterdam and YIELD. In december 2015 I started my PhD-project under supervision of dr. Elske Salemink, dr. Helle Larsen, Prof. Reinout Wiers, and Prof. Susan Bogels combined with clinical work one day a week at the Department of Obsessive Compulsive-, Anxiety- and Tic disorders of the Bascule. The project is on improving attentional bias modification for social anxiety by training in an anxious state based on models of context-relevant learning. In the first study, anxiety induction will be added to a single session of training in a subclinical population followed by studies that will test more sessions of training, combined with CBT, in subclinical and clinical samples.

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Emese Kroon (MSc), PhD student


After completing a psychobiology bachelor and psychology research master at the University of Amsterdam, I started my PhD-project at the ADAPT lab in September 2018, under the supervision of Janna Cousijn and Reinout Wiers. My project is part of a study on cross-cultural neuroimaging of cannabis dependence. Within this project, I focus of the role of behavioural control cannabis use. By assessing the differences between ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ behavioural control in ‘heavy’ vs. ‘dependent’ users on both the brain and behavioural level, I hope to get more insight into the role of behavioural control in cannabis use disorder while also assessing the utility of several tasks commonly used to measure behavioural control in addiction

See my UvA profile.
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Lauren Kuhns (MSc), PhD student

After graduating from Yale University in 2014 with a BA in Psychology (with distinction), I worked as a Research Associate in organizational behavior at Harvard Business School for a year before moving to the Netherlands to do the Research Master Psychology program at the University of Amsterdam. During this program, I developed my interest in addiction research and conducted studies on habit formation and craving. I am mainly interested in the how social processes influence addictive behavior on an individual and cultural level, and what these social processes can tell us about the mechanisms of addiction.

My PhD project focuses on clarifying the motivational neuromechanisms underlying cannabis dependence and investigating the potential moderators of these mechanisms (e.g. culture, age, tobacco use). To fulfill these aims, I am conducting a cross-cultural longitudinal neuroimaging study with cannabis dependent individuals and non-using matched controls in collaboration with the University of Texas-Dallas. I work under the supervision of Reinout Wiers, Janna Cousijn, and Francesca Filbey.

Find me on LinkedIn.

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Christiane Wesarg (MSc), PhD student

During my studies of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, I became particularly interested in the consequences of childhood adversity on a biological and behavioral level. After graduating from Technical University Dresden (Germany) with a Master’s degree, I started working at UvA on a project investigating the effects of adverse family functioning on suboptimal development of self-regulation in toddlers. Among the central aspects of this project is the examination of how maltreatment alters the functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and how these alterations in turn may negatively impact early development of self-regulation. Additionally, it will be investigated whether the negative impact of childhood adversity can be prevented by an early intervention aimed to improve parent-child interactions.

Find me on ResearchGate.

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Leroy Snippe (MSc), PhD student

Since 2016 I have been working on several studies investigating the potential of innovative (digital) interventions for Gambling Disorder (GD), mainly focussing on online Cognitive Bias Modification-based interventions. These projects are a combined effort between the University of Amsterdam, the Antwerp University (Belgium) and the Dalhousie University (Canada). The aim is to increase the reach and effectiveness of available treatments for GD. Besides my work for the ADAPT lab, I am also employed as a therapist at Rodersana, an addiction treatment facility in the Netherlands. As a therapist, I am mainly involved in individual counceling, but I also supervise groups and conduct diagnostic research.

See my UvA profile.

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Mariska van der Hoff (MSc), PhD student

After finishing my master in Clinical Neuropsychology at VU University Amsterdam in 2017 and a couple months of travelling, I started working in October 2018 at the Child’s Developmental Psychology department of the University of Amsterdam. Currently, I am working on the UvAcare project which is aimed at improving the mental health of all students and PhD-students from the UvA. This project was designed to provide students more insight into their well-being and develop additional, more accessible care for students. Therefore, we developed an e-health intervention (with a guided and unguided feedback condition) for students with mild to severe symptoms of depression and anxiety based on principles of cognitive behavioral therapy.

The interesting thing about this project is that it is a combines (low threshold) care with research and it involves on a broad range of mental health behaviors, such as depression, anxiety, sleep and substance use. My main focus will be on alcohol use among students and how this is related to other mental health problems as well as study performance. Additionally, I am interested in how students could be motivated to lower their alcohol consumption and what type of low threshold (online/smartphone-based) intervention could be helpful for this

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Tim Janssen (PhD), former PhD student

Biographical sketch
I am Tim Janssen, a former PhD-student at the University of Amsterdam, at the Developmental Psychology department. I worked at the UvA from 2009 until 2015. I studied Psychology in Maastricht before coming to Amsterdam. My origins are in Eindhoven, where I still travel to many a weekend to cheer for PSV, its local football club, and play football with my friends.

Research Project
My research involved the etiology of alcohol abuse among Dutch youth. To examine influences that determine alcohol abuse related outcomes, I performed a longitudinal study among Dutch youth aged 12-16, asking them to fill out questionnaires and execute performance tasks measuring constructs previously related to alcohol use. In the case of the former, think of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) as a measure of alcohol abuse related outcomes and the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) as a measure of risk personality. In the case of the latter, performance tasks, think of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to measure implicit associations with alcohol and the Dot Probe Test to measure attention bias.

Research gate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tim_Janssen3
Brown University

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Ozlem Korucuoglu (MSc), former PhD student

After finishing my bachelor of Psychology in 2007 in Turkey (METU), I moved to the Netherlands to continue my education at the University of Groningen (RuG). I completed Behavioral And Cognitive Neuroscience Research Master program and Master Degree Program in Psychology in RuG. In 2009, I started my PhD under the supervision of Reinout Wiers and Thomas Gladwin at the University of Amsterdam. My PhD research focuses on the effect of acute alcohol on neurocognitive systems involved in the aetiology of alcohol addiction and the predictive value of these alcohol-induced changes in drug escalation in youth. The effects of acute alcohol mimic the long-term neuroadaptations, which take place in chronic users. Currently I am investigating this effect in a variety of cognitive processes (i.e cognitive flexibility, inhibition) and of automatic motivational processes (i.e. reward sensitivity, approach and attentional bias) with the use of electroencephalography and fMRI. Moreover, the level of response to alcohol varies among individuals; i.e. people with low response to alcohol have higher risk for addiction. For a better understanding of individual differences in addiction, it seems crucial to take into account gene-environment interaction and therefore we also focus on the individual differences in genetics.

University of Missouri: Social Cognitive and Addiction Neuroscience Lab

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Sebastiaan Dovis (PhD), former PhD student

My research focuses on the deficits in the executive functioning of children with ADHD and on methods to improve and treat these deficits.
My specific skills include ADHD clinical expertise, design of neuropsychological measures and training tasks, experimental designs and randomized controlled trials, theoretical game design.
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Poppy Watson (PhD), former PhD student

I did my PhD under the supervision of Prof. Reinout Wiers (Developmental Psychopathology, UvA), dr. Sanne de Wit (Clinical Psychology, UvA) and Prof. Bernhard Hommel (Cognitive Psychology, Leiden University).

The aim of my research was to investigate the relative contribution of both cognitive and motivational components in action selection, within the context of decision-making that is both adaptive and maladaptive (i.e. as seen in addiction or obesity).

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Denise van Deursen (MSc), former PhD student

Biographical sketch
I studied psychology at Utrecht University, where I specialized in clinical psychology. During my Master's program, I conducted a study on the effectiveness of an intervention for bereaved parents at York University, in Toronto, Canada. This study fuelled my passion for research, and after I graduated (cum laude) in 2007, I immediately started working as a research assistant at Utrecht University. Through my work as a research assistant, I gained experience in experimental psychopathology and soon realized I wanted to do my PhD in this area. In 2009, I started my PhD at the University of Amsterdam under supervision of Reinout Wiers and Elske Salemink.

Research Project
In my research, I investigate the role of relatively automatic cognitive biases that play a role in alcohol addiction, e.g. selective attention for alcohol cues, and automatic approach tendencies. More specifically, I study the effectiveness of different computerized cognitive bias modification (CBM) procedures in reducing alcohol related problems, both among heavy drinkers (through the internet) and among alcohol addicted patients (admitted in clinics). I am interested in both more fundamental questions regarding cognitive bias modification (What are the mechanisms through which CBM works?) as well as more applied research questions (e.g. Can CBM elicit clinically relevant changes in alcohol use?).

Specific skills
My specific skills include experimental psychopathology, reaction time measures, intervention outcome research, Internet interventions.

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Wouter Boendermaker (PhD), former PhD student

After a (brief) study in computer science, Wouter (1982) graduated in clinical developmental psychology, as well as the research master psychology in 2009 (cum laude) at the University of Amsterdam. Since then he has worked as a technical assistant for the ADAPT team of Prof. Reinout Wiers, designing and programming executive function tasks in Flash for online research and subsequently on a PhD project in which he designed and developed several Serious Games aimed at increasing motivation to train among heavy drinking or blowing adolescents and include executive function training, as well as retraining of attentional and approach biases (cognitive bias modification, CBM). The games were compared to the regular versions of these tasks to see if these forms of training are effective, and whether a motivating environment strengthens this effect. We have also collected fMRI data using one of the games. The project was under supervision of profs. Reinout Wiers and Pier Prins.
Currently, Wouter is an assistant professor at Utrecht University, working on a project on the development of a new serious game aimed at training delay of gratification in adolescent alcohol users.

For examples of the psychological tasks and Serious Games developed in these projects, have a look at Wouter's personal website: www.wouboe.nl

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Leone de Voogd (PhD), former PhD student

I joined the ADAPT-lab in 2011, working on my PhD-project "Always look on the bright side of life" on prevention of anxiety and depression and increasing emotional resilience in adolescents by training cognitive processes. We used computer training programs aimed at modifying attention bias and interpretation bias and increasing cognitive control. The effects of these training programs on cognitive processes as well as emotional functioning of adolescents have been investigated in two large scale studies: one in unselected adolescents, and one in adolescents with heightened symptoms of anxiety or depression. I obtained my PhD in 2016 and continued working at the UvA as a postdoctoral researcher in developmental psychology and educational sociology. In 2018, I started working as a policy advisor in education (see here).

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Tess Den Uyl (PhD), former PhD student

I have completed a bachelor in Psychobiology and a master in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Amsterdam. I'm very interested in research on emotion and motivation in relation to psychopathology, especially focusing on the underlying brain processes. In 2012 I started working on my PhD project with Reinout Wiers and Thomas Gladwin. My research focuses on improving treatment for alcohol addiction by combining transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) with Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM). With tDCS a very low electrical current is sent through the brain thereby influencing the excitability of the cortex. By combining tDCS with cognitive training tasks we hope to make the training more beneficial. We investigated several behavioural and electrical brain stimulation interventions and also look at the electrophysiological processes that are involved.

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Kiki Nikolaou (PhD), former post-doctoral researcher



See my UvA profile and list of publications.



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Iman Elfeddali (PhD), former associate team member

Iman Elfeddali obtained her PhD degree at Maastricht University. The title of the dissertation is 'Towards Successful Web-Based Smoking Relapse Prevention - The efficacy of a computer tailored program incorporating post-motivational components & an attentional bias modification program.' Currently she works a postdoctoral researcher at Maastricht University and as senior researcher and psychologist at the Top Clinical Centre of Body, Mind and Health of the GGZ Breburg (Tilburg, the Netherlands). Her current research projects entail the development of eHealth interventions of smokers who are not yet motivated to quit smoking utilizing implicit retraining strategies (at Maastricht University) and the development of eHealth interventions for professionals and patients (i.e. patients with combined physical and psychological complaints) of the Top clinical Centre of Body Mind and Health. Her expertise lies in applying social cognitive theories in prevention programs, Web-based computer tailoring, motivational processes, implicit cognitive processes, shared decision making, combined physical and psychological complaints and the development of eHealth applications.

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Margot Peeters (PhD), former Post-doctoral researcher

Margot Peeters (1984) started her phd project under supervision of prof. Wilma Vollebergh and prof. Reinout Wiers, studying automatic and controlled processes in relation to adolescents' alcohol use. She received her PhD degree (cum laude) in 2014 at Utrecht University. Currently, she is Assistant Professor at the department of Youth in Changing Cultural Contexts (Utrecht University) studying the development of risk behavior (e.g. alcohol use, drugs use, externalizing behavior, gaming) from early adolescence to young adulthood. She is interested in individual differences and differences in the social context associated with engagement in risk behavior.
She has a special interest for longitudinal analyzing techniques (e.g. latent transition, zero inflated, survival analysis, missing data analysis, Bayesian statistics) to study the development of adolescents.
See her profile here.

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Thomas Gladwin (PhD), former Post-doctoral researcher

My work focuses on the neurocognitive mechanisms of addiction, in particular the processes underlying the relationships between motivation, cognitive control and automatic biases. We used various techniques to study these processes and interactions, including electroencephalography, fMRI and tDCS. The practical goal is to use the results and methods in theory-driven interventions.
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Esther Beraha (PhD), former PhD student







See my UvA profile.



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Mieke Schulte (PhD), former PhD student

I completed my bachelor in Psychobiology and master in Cognitive Neuroscience, both at the University of Amsterdam. Both my master research projects were in the field of addiction, and after graduating I acquired an assistant job conducting a review on neurocognitive effects of substance dependence. I was a PhD student in the ADAPT-lab at the Department of Developmental Psychology of the University of Amsterdam in collaboration with the Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research at the Department of Psychiatry of the Academic Medical Center. I studied the effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine on smoking cessation and its effect on cognitive processes and brain glutamate concentrations, using behavioral measures as well as fMRI and H-MRS. Subsequently I aimed to treat cocaine dependence by targeting the underlying cognitive processes, by applying N-acetylcysteine and working memory training. Behavioral measures (i.a. with the use of Ecological Momentary Assessment) as well as fMRI and H-MRS were acquired during the study.

See my research here.

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Marilisa Boffo (PhD), former Post-doctoral researcher

Biographical sketch
Marilisa Boffo is a clinical psychologist and a research methodologist. She studied Clinical Psychology at the University of Padua and graduated cum laude in 2008. For almost two years, she worked as a research assistant at the Department of Applied Psychology of the University of Padua and completed her one-year professional clinical internship at the University Hospital of Padua. From 2011 to 2013, she completed her PhD on Research Methods in Clinical Psychology at the Department of Applied Psychology of the University of Padua, under the supervision of Prof. Stefania Mannarini. During this period she started collaborating with prof. Reinout Wiers and spent eight months as visiting PhD student at the ADAPT lab, where she designed and started a randomized clinical trial in collaboration with an outpatient addiction health care institute in Italy. In 2014 Marilisa moved to Amsterdam and started her first post-doc on a project on Cognitive Bias Modification for gambling disorders in collaboration with Prof. Geert Dom (Collaborative Antwerp Research Institute, University of Antwerp, Belgium) and Prof. Reinout Wiers. From the end of 2014, Marilisa has started a second post-doc project at the University of Amsterdam within the NextLevel project in collaboration with Prof. Valentijn Visch (Department of Industrial Design, TUDelft), Prof. Reinout Wiers and Dr. Elske Salemink, focusing on the application of game design principles to optimise e-health interventions for internalizing and externalizing disorders.

Main Research Topics
My research interests generally concern with cognitive processes underlying the aetiology and maintenance of substance and behavioural addiction disorders, with a narrow focus on treatment of alcohol and gambling disorders. My current research line has a twofold focus: the use of new technology/e-health platforms and the investigation of novel treatment venues, such as Cognitive Bias Modification interventions, with the inclusion of game elements. As a result of my background in research methods, I am further specialising in the design and management of randomized clinical trials, with a special attention on their methodological aspects (i.e., protocol design, outcome assessment, data management and analysis, etc.).

For a list of publications click here
NextLevel website

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Edwin Wever (MSc), external PhD student

Biographical sketch
I graduated at the clinical neuropsychology program at the VU University Amsterdam, in 2005. In the same year I joined the research department at De Forensische Zorgspecialisten (Forensic Care Specialists) in Utrecht. In 2015, I started my doctoral research at the University of Amsterdam as an external PhD candidate under supervision of prof. dr. Reinout Wiers and dr. Wineke Smid (De Forensische Zorgspecialisten).

Current Research Project
My doctoral research is focused on implicit assessment and modification of cognitive processes that underlie risk of sexual offending behaviour. For instance, a research project regarding the assessment and retraining of approach tendencies towards visual sexual stimuli in an outpatient forensic population, using an Approach-Avoidance Task. The study design is based on the assumption that these approach tendencies are involved in sexually preoccupied behaviour, which is a major risk factor for sexual recidivism.

Research gate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Edwin_Wever

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Jolien Dopmeijer (MSc), external PhD student

Biographical sketch
After finishing my Bachelor in Nursing at Windesheim University of Applied Sciences in 2003, I've worked in a clinical setting for addiction health care for several years. In 2004 I started at the Clinical Health Sciences Program of Utrecht University, and graduated in Nursing Science in 2007. It was in 2008 that I left the clinical field and became a lecturer in Nursing at Windesheim University of Applied Sciences. Since 2013 I am responsible for the Research Minor for our Nursing students in their 3rd and 4th year. When in 2010 the lectureship Prevention of Addiction and Substance Abuse started I joined the research group and since then I've been combining lectureship and research. In 2013 I met prof. dr. Reinout Wiers and started as an external PhD candidate under his supervision and under the supervision of professor of Prevention of Addiction and Substance Abuse mr. dr. Rob Bovens and associate professor dr. Jannet de Jonge (Windesheim University of Applied Sciences).

Current Research Project
My PhD research focusses on the psychosocial wellbeing of students in higher education. The aim of my research is to investigate the relationship between psychosocial problems and academic performance and the association between study environment in higher education and psychological interventions. My goal is to contribute to a safe study environment for students which leads to social and academic integration and therefore prevention of unnecessary delay or drop-out. In 2014 I received a grant (Promotiebeurs voor Leraren) from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) for this research project


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Jeanine Baartmans (MSc), external PhD student

I am an external PhD-student supervised by Prof. Dr. Susan Bögels, Prof. Dr. Reinout Wiers, Dr. Anke Klein, and Dr. Bonny van Steensel. My project focuses on social anxiety in children. Part of the project focuses on investigating the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy for children with social anxiety compared to the effectiveness of this therapy for children with other anxiety disorders. The other part of my project is about the relation between social anxiety, likeability by peers and cognitive biases related to the perception of peer acceptance. I combine working on by PhD-thesis with working in the clinical field at UvA minds, academic treatment centre for parents and children. Before I started my PhD-project I finished my bachelor programs in psychology and pedagogy, partly at the Radboud University and partly at the University of Amsterdam. After my bachelors I completed my masters in developmental psychology, pedagogy, and a research master in child development and education at the University of Amsterdam.

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Thomas Pronk (MSc), psychoinformaticist

I develop software for experimental psychology, with a focus on implicit cognitions in e-health and m-health. Implicit cognitions and Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) have great potential to be deployed on massive scales, and the paradigms we use can easily be adapted to various languages and afflictions. I develop software applications that allow us to do so, bringing our state-of-the-art study and intervention-designs to the masses.

Researchgate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Thomas_Pronk

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